News

Thankful for Partnerships

The Open Space Authority is a small agency with a big mission and we need to work with like-minded organizations to accomplish our goals. In 2017 the Authority is proud to have increased our work with community partners to conserve land, restore landscapes, connect people to nature, and sustain our natural resources for future generations.

Read More January 04, 2018

The Critical Pathway for Wildlife

The Open Space Authority is excited to share updates in the quest to protect the Coyote Valley wildlife linkage between the Santa Cruz Mountains and the Diablo Range. The Authority and its partners at the Wilmers Lab at UC Santa Cruz, Peninsula Open Space Trust, and Pathways for Wildlife, started the Bobcat and Gray Fox Connectivity Study last spring and are wrapping up the final field season now with a total of 22 bobcats collared so far! Fitting the bobcats with advanced GPS-collars is generating fine-scale movement data and information that will be vital to informing planners on how these animals are moving in Coyote Valley.

Read More January 04, 2018

25th Anniversary Year Kicks Off

The Open Space Authority is kicking off its 25th Anniversary Year in 2018! The Authority began in 1993 as a grassroots effort by citizen activists wanting to protect Santa Clara Valley’s important natural resources. We started as a small agency with an important role to play and have since grown into a diverse organization with greater capacity to make progress on our mission of conserving the natural environment, supporting agriculture, and connecting people to nature. Measure Q has provided further opportunity to fulfill our mission by enabling us to expand public access to nature in and around our urban communities, increase our environmental education programming, and help us maintain our open space preserves for public enjoyment.

Read More January 04, 2018

Wet Weather & Winter Hiking Tips

Rain brings new growth, running streams, creeks and salamanders, but it also can make for muddy and slippery trails. 

Here are some wet weather and winter hiking tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable day in nature:

Read More January 04, 2018

Open Space Authority Approves Measure Q Environmental Education Grant Program

San Jose, CA - December 18, 2017: The Santa Clara Valley Open Space Authority's Board of Directors approved a new Measure Q Environmental Education Grant Program designed to advance environmental literacy and nature-oriented experiences for children, adults, and families free of charge. This competitive grant program is funded by Measure Q, a voter-approved Open Space funding measure and invites proposals for nature and science-based environmental education programs and youth engagement projects in one or more of these categories:

Read More December 18, 2017

Calaveras Fault Trail Status Update

Due to the closure of Alum Rock Falls Road after the severe February, 2017 storms, the Open Space Authority acted as a good neighbor to allow short-term vehicular access to residents of Alum Rock Falls Road across the Calaveras Fault Trail in the eastern portion of Sierra Vista Open Space Preserve. Without this access, the residents would have no other means to access their homes.

Read More December 15, 2017

Active Stream and Wetland Restoration at Diablo Foothills Open Space Preserve

If you’ve traveled east to Los Banos, then chances are you’ve driven the narrow Highway 152. In 2014, Caltrans completed a big task to widen the highway to include an additional 2 lanes in certain sections. In order to complete the project, Caltrans committed to mitigating for the loss of riparian habitat during construction and the Open Space Authority’s Diablo Foothills Open Space Preserve was the perfect location. 

Read More December 06, 2017

A Grazing Management Strategy is Key to Promoting Native Biodiversity

The Open Space Authority uses cattle grazing as a management tool to enhance the native biodiversity of California’s rare grasslands and oak savannas that support many native plants and animals, including endangered species. Grasslands have become rare due to development, and the remaining protected grasslands are under threat from invasive plant species. Invasive plants outcompete native plants for resources and suppressing natural wildfires have caused many shrubs and trees to establish themselves in grasslands. In the absence of fire or grazing, litter accumulates on the soil and can become fuel for extreme fires.

Read More December 06, 2017

Blazing Trails in More Ways Than One: Climate Change and Transparency at Forefront

The Little Hoover Commission, formed in 1962 to oversee California’s special districts, recently released a report that led to several recommendations meant to improve service to local communities. Climate change adaptation and transparency were two areas of focus where the Open Space Authority already exceeded the recommendations.

Read More December 06, 2017

Google’s San Jose village plan seeks success where Coyote Valley project fizzled

Authored by George Avalos and published in The Mercury News November 11, 2017. Photo by LiPo Ching.

SAN JOSE — Thirty-five years ago, San Jose agreed to move forward with an ambitious plan to build a massive technology campus, aiming to ease traffic jams by offering reverse commutes for employees living in burgeoning nearby communities.

The project promised to bring thousands of jobs. It would have built a transit link as well, with access to rail for the workers who opted out of commuting by car.

 It may sound eerily similar to Google’s proposed transit village, but San Jose’s past effort to build a huge tech campus in Coyote Valley — far from the downtown core — never got off the ground, despite many attempts to resurrect it from the ash heap of history.

Read More November 11, 2017